Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat a wide range of conditions affecting the hip joint. This procedure can be used to confirm the diagnosis of various imaging procedures, such as X-rays and MRIs, as it provides a three-dimensional, real-time image of the affected area. If damage or abnormalities are detected during the arthroscopy, repairs can often be made during the same procedure.

Reasons for Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopies can be performed for a number of reasons, to definitively diagnose or repair of the following conditions:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Joint cartilage (labral) tears
  • Loose pieces of bone or cartilage, or bone spurs
  • Snapping hip syndrome

Candidates for Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is considered an ideal treatment option for many conditions affecting the hip, since it offers smaller incisions, shorter recovery times and less scarring. Patients can often return home the same day as their procedure and resume their regular activities in just a few weeks, while enjoying less pain, greater range of motion and restored joint function.

While arthroscopy offers many advantages over conventional hip surgery, it is not right for all patients, especially those with conditions affecting hard-to-visualize areas. In such cases, traditional surgery may be more appropriate.

Hip Arthroscopy Procedure

During the hip arthroscopy procedure, the surgeon makes a small incision near the affected area of the hip and inserts an arthroscope, a long flexible tube with a camera and a tiny light on the end. This device displays magnified images of the inside of the hip joint on a video monitor for the surgeon to view in real time. During this diagnostic part of the procedure, the hip is examined for any signs of tearing, damage or degeneration to the ligaments, cartilage and other internal structures.

If damage is detected, it can often be repaired during the same procedure by creating a few more small incisions through which tiny surgical instruments are inserted. These instruments allow the surgeon to replace damaged cartilage, join together torn ends, remove loose bodies or realign the joint to minimize pain and inflammation. Once the repair has been performed, the tools and arthroscope are removed and the incisions are sutured closed. A dressing will be applied to the area, which will later be replaced with smaller bandages as the incisions heal.

Recovery from Hip Arthroscopy

After the hip arthroscopy procedure, patients may experience pain, swelling and bruising at the incision sites for several days. Pain medication and the application of ice are advised in order to manage this pain and reduce inflammation. Most patients will be encouraged to get up and walk around as soon as possible, but will need to use crutches or a walker for 7 to 10 days as healing takes place.

In order to restore function and strength to the hip joint, patients will need to undergo a customized physical rehabilitation program after surgery, designed to meet their individual goals. Physical rehabilitation may include weight-bearing exercises, hip mobilization techniques, flexibility exercises and other activities that target the various muscles of the region: the quadriceps, the hamstrings, the gluteals, the abductors and adductors. The length of the rehabilitation regimen varies according the patient’s specific condition and rate of healing. Most patients are able to return to full physical activity after several weeks, but other may require up to 12 weeks to fully recover.

Risks of Hip Arthroscopy

While hip arthroscopy is considered safer and more efficient than conventional hip procedures, there are still certain risks associated with any type of surgery. Some of these risks may include:

  • Infection
  • Nerve or blood vessel damage
  • Tissue damage
  • Prolonged pain
  • Blood clots

Patients should discuss these and other risks with the doctor before undergoing hip arthroscopy.

Request An Appointment

  • * All indicated fields must be completed.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.


  • Monday: 8:30am – 5:00pm
  • Tuesday: 8:30am – 5:00pm
  • Wednesday: 8:30am – 5:00pm
  • Thursday: 8:30am – 5:00pm
  • Friday: 8:30am – 5:00pm
  • Saturday: Closed
  • Sunday: Closed

The Musculoskeletal Center

4 Centennial Drive, Suite 201 Peabody, MA 01960

Directions >

Mass General - North Shore

104 Endicott Street, Suite LL00 Danvers, MA 01923

Directions >

978.531.0800                  

Fax: 978-531-2929

At New England Orthopedic Specialists, patient health and well-being is our highest priority. In light of recent COVID-19 developments, patients should be assured that we employ the highest standards of safety and infection control protocols. We are continuously monitoring and following state and federal guidelines regarding avoiding potential exposure to the virus.

We are currently open and seeing patients at our location in Peabody. Based on the current recommendations, we are limiting patient visits to the office based on clinical needs. If you have an appointment and have not heard from us, you can plan on attending your appointment. However, if you are experiencing any cold or flu-like symptoms or may have had exposure to the virus through traveling or direct contact, please call us so that we can determine the best plan of action.

We will be contacting you if the physician has determined that your appointment can be postponed. In many cases, we are utilizing telephone visits as much as possible to check in with you. We are keeping track of visits that are being cancelled and will contact you when it has been determined it is safe to see patients again on a routine basis.

If you have experienced a recent injury or are experiencing any serious orthopedic issues, please give us a call at 978-531-0800. Avoid the emergency room. Our Ortho Express is staffed and ready to care for your urgent needs, including availability of imaging and bracing, all in one location.